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Financial Correlation of Privacy Rights

Posted in Behavioral Advertising, Data Privacy Law or Regulation, Privacy Law

As a firm focused on all evolving aspects of privacy law, InfoLawGroup is obviously often called upon to assist its clients with consumer privacy legal issues.  This post takes a detour towards privacy theory terrain and is prodded by a recent New York Times article.  In Letting Down Our Guard With Web Privacy, published on March 30, 2013, the author details ongoing research being conducted by Alessandro Acquisti, a behavioral economist at Carnegie Mellon University.  Mr. Acquisti’s research is cutting edge when it comes to online behavioral advertising (OBA)  and associated consumer behavior.  Indeed, he’s the academic who famously announced in 2011 that one might be able to discover portions of someone’s social security number simply by virtue of a posted photograph.   His research often distills to one major premise – consumers may not always act in their best interests when it comes to online privacy decisions.

It appears consumers and merchants alike may be missing out on fully cultivating a very valuable commodity.  According to the World Economic Forum, “personal data represents an emerging asset class, potentially every bit as valuable as other assets such as traded goods, gold or oil.”  Rethinking Personal Data:  Strengthening Trust, at 7, World Economic Forum Report (May 2012).  Before this asset class can ever be completely exploited and fully commercialized, however, its constituent value components must be correlated by all in the privacy food chain.

Over three decades ago, it was recognized that the three pillars of privacy – the very foundation of personal data – secrecy, anonymity, and solitude, were distinct yet interrelated.  See Gavison, Ruth, Privacy and the Limits of Law, 89 The Yale Law Journal 421, 428-429 (1980) (“A loss of privacy occurs as others obtain information about an individual, pay attention to him, or gain access to him. These three elements of secrecy, anonymity, and solitude are distinct and independent, but interrelated, and the complex concept of privacy is richer than any definition centered around only one of them.”).

Current OBA has made it so these three privacy pillars may be confusing for consumers to value, manage, and isolate when online – it is not generally up to consumers whether they will be fed an ad based on previous website visits or purchases – it will just happen.  Indeed, according to a survey of 1,000 persons conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs and released by Microsoft in January 2013, forty-five percent of respondents felt they had little or no control over the personal information companies gather about them while they are browsing the Web or using online services.  This view may not be unfounded given that data routinely gathered online, e.g., operating system, browser, IP address, persistent cookies, last used server, can be used to divulge the activity of individual devices.

The privacy trade-offs being researched by Mr. Acquisti and others offer insight into the true value of these data constituents.  Consumers who try to “shut off” or render anonymous access to their device’s data or settings, would not only likely fail in their attempt at being anonymized, they would also lose out on access to most social media and other websites requiring browsers to accept cookies as well as product offers that may presumably be of interest.  Indeed, this coordinated tracking of consumers is not even unique to the Internet.   See generally Bibas, Steve, A Contractual Approach to Data Privacy, 17 Harv. J. Law & Public Policy 591 (Spring 1994) (“Although the ready availability of information helps us to trust others and coordinate actions, it also lessens our privacy. George Orwell presciently expressed our fear of losing all privacy to an omniscient Big Brother.  Computers today track our telephone calls, credit-card spending, plane flights, educational and employment records, medical histories, and more.  Someone with free access to this information could piece together a coherent picture of our actions.”).  There are even companies that bridge the gap between offline and online activities by taking in-store point of sale purchases and converting such data to an anonymous online cookie ID that will eventually be used online by clients.  Such use of in-store data is generally permissible under a retailer’s loyalty program.

Current law does not generally prevent someone from collecting public information to create consumer profiles – nor is there the right to opt out of having your public record information sold or shared.  And, when one wants to self-determine whether data will be disclosed or whether he or she will be “untraceable”, “anonymous” or “left alone”, there may not always exist the ability to easily curtail these rights from being exploited – there is certainly no way to obtain a direct financial gain in return for the relinquishment of such privacy rights.  Instead, there has generally been a “privacy for services” marketing/advertizing arrangement that has been accepted by consumers – which, in fact, has helped pay for and fuel the growth of the commercial Internet.

The current OBA ecosystem does not posit a “loss of privacy” as much as it offers a bartering system where one party feels the value of what is being bartered away while the other party actually quantifies with cascading/monetizing transactions what is only felt by the other party.  In other words, it is not a financial transaction.  Those who are able to find an entertaining online video or locate a product online using a search engine don’t really mind that an ad will be served to them while visiting some other website given they feel this loss of privacy is worth the value of the services being provided.

Ironically, the interactive advertising industry itself may believe it is collecting too much sensitive consumer data.  According to a study conducted by the Ponemon Institute, 67 percent of responding online advertisers believe “limiting sensitive data collection for OBA purposes is key to improving consumer privacy and control when browsing or shopping online.” Leading Practices in Behavioral Advertising & Consumer Privacy:  A Study of Internet Marketers & Advertisers, at 2, The Ponemon Institute (February 2012).

As recognized by privacy researchers, “[e]mpirical evidence on the behavioral effects of privacy is rather scarce.”  Regner, Tobias; Riener, Gerhard, Voluntary Payments, Privacy and Social Pressure On The Internet: A Natural Field Experiment, DICE Discussion Paper, No. 82 (December 2012) at 6.  Although “some consumers are willing to pay a premium to purchase from privacy protective websites”; there is no measure of what that premium should be or how widespread a factor it is for consumers as a whole.  Id. at 7.

More often than not, consumers have been “often willing to provide personal information for small or no rewards.”  Losses, Gains, and Hyperbolic Discounting: An Experimental Approach to Information Security Attitudes and Behavior, presented by Alessandro Acquisti and Jens Grossklags at the 2nd Annual Workshop on Economics and Information Security, College Park, Maryland, May 2003, at 4.

This does not mean researchers have not tried to quantify a “privacy valuation” model.  In 2002, a Jupiter Research study found 82% of online shoppers willing to give personal data to new shopping sites in exchange for the chance to win $100.  See c.f. Tsai, Janice; Egelman, Serge; Cranor, Lorrie; Acquisti, Alessandro; The Effect of Online Privacy Information on Purchasing Behavior: An Experimental Study, Information Systems Research (February 2010) at 22 (describing survey results which concludes that “people will tend to purchase from merchants that offer more privacy protection and even pay a premium to purchase from such merchants.”); Beresford, Alastair; Kübler, Dorothea; Preibusch, Sören, Unwillingness To Pay For Privacy: A Field Experiment, 117 Economics Letters 25 (2010) (“Thus, participants predominantly chose the firm with the lower price and the more sensitive data requirement, indicating that they are willing to provide information about their monthly income and date of birth for a 1 Euro discount.”).

In his 1994 paper, A Contractual Approach to Data Privacy, Steve Bibas suggests that individual contracts may provide the best solution to the privacy compensation dilemma:  “In the hands of the contracting parties, however, flexibility allows people to control their lives and efficiently tailor the law to meet their needs. Flexibility is the market’s forte; the pricing mechanism is extremely sensitive to variations in valuation and quickly adjusts to them.”  Bibas, 17 Harv. J. Law & Public Policy 591 (Spring 1994).   Mr. Bibas, however, recognized the limitations in what could be accomplished with privacy transactions that relied only on static privacy trades.  In other words, a model that might be effective is one that customizes the financial rewards to consumers and are based on a continuous exchange of information between the consumer and merchant.

One problem most consumers face when using commonly marketed solutions that are meant to safeguard their privacy is that these solutions fail to also create an acceptable value proposition for merchants.  As well, those recently formed companies promising a private web experience will not be able to – nor should they even try – to curtail firms from using OBA to reach consumers.  For the foreseeable future, OBA will continue to drive the Internet and “pay” for a much richer and rewarding consumer experience than would otherwise exist.  It may one day be determined, however, that an even more effective means to satisfy all constituent needs of the OBA ecosystem (consumer, merchant, publisher, agency, etc.) will be to find a means to directly correlate between privacy rights, consumer data, and a merchant’s revenue.