Posts in Health Care

baa, business associate, enforcement rule, fundraising, HHS, HIPAA, marketing, modifications, notice of privacy practices, npp, NPRM, privacy rule, protected health information, research, restrictions, sale, security rule, subcontractors

FAQ on the Proposed Modifications to the HIPAA Rules: Part Two

By InfoLawGroup LLP on July 15, 2010

This post is Part Two of my FAQ on the proposed modifications to the HIPAA Rules issued by HHS last week. Part Two focuses on the proposed modifications to the Privacy Rule.

baa, business associate, enforcement rule, HHS, HIPAA, modifications, NPRM, privacy rule, protected health information, security rule, subcontractors

FAQ on the Proposed Modifications to the HIPAA Rules: Part One

By InfoLawGroup LLP on July 12, 2010

As reported last week, on Thursday the Department of Health and Human Services ("HHS") issued its long-anticipated Notice of Proposed Rulemaking ("NPRM") on Modifications to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act ("HIPAA") Privacy, Security, and Enforcement Rules under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (the "HITECH" Act). For those of us who subscribe to numerous technology and law listservs, this meant emailboxes flooded with opinions, criticism, speculation, and flat-out fear mongering. We thought people might like to know what the proposed modifications actually say, and what they mean. So, this post provides Part One of a FAQ on the 234 page NPRM. This post, Part One, addresses general issues (including significant changes involving subcontractors) and proposed modifications to the HIPAA Security and Enforcement Rules. Part Two, later this week, will address the proposed modifications to the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

IAPP, International Association of Privacy Professionals

My Notes from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit 2010

By InfoLawGroup LLP on April 21, 2010

As some of you know, I tweeted my notes from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit 2010 yesterday and today (@Forsheit for those of you on Twitter). Since many of our readers are not on Twitter, I thought I would provide you with those notes here (minus the usual Twitter hashtags and abbreviations). Please note that there were multiple sessions, and this reflects only those I was able to attend, and only the information I could quickly record, putting virtual pen to paper. These are not direct quotes, unless specifically designated as such. Overall, I think it was a great conference, a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with other lawyers and privacy professionals, and to meet students, lawyers, and others looking to learn more about this constantly evolving legal and compliance space. For me, the conference highlight was Viktor Mayer-Schonberger's keynote this morning on The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age. Without further ado, here are my notes. Would love to hear your thoughts/reactions.

IAPP, International Association of Privacy Professionals, Red Flags Rule

Live from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC, It's Monday Afternoon

By InfoLawGroup LLP on April 19, 2010

This week, I will be providing short updates from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC. The conference will be in full swing tomorrow, and I will report on various panels and topics of interest. In the meantime, as I prepare to see old and new friends at the Welcome Reception this evening, a few thoughts on what I expect to see and hear a lot over the next few days.

Alberta, breach notice, British Columbia, Canada, Ontario, Quebec

Security Breach Notices for Canadian Data

By W. Scott Blackmer on March 19, 2010

Notice of significant security breaches involving personal information is recommended under federal Privacy Commissioner guidelines and legally required for custodians of personal health information in Ontario. Albert's new Bill 54, not yet in force, sets a new standard for mandatory notification to the provincial Privacy Commissioner, who can determine whether and how individuals must be notified.

business associate, covered entity, delay, exceptions, financial, reputational, or other harm, HIPAA, HITECH HIPAA breach notification covered entity business associate significan..., law enforcement, or other harm exceptions law enforcement delay risk assessment, reputational, risk assessment, significant risk

The New Health Care Breach Notification Landscape -- HHS Rules

By InfoLawGroup LLP on October 05, 2009

On February 17, 2009, Congress signed into law the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health or "HITECH" Act ("HITECH" or the "Act") as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The HITECH Act requires entities covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act ("HIPAA") to provide notification to affected individuals and to the Secretary of Health and Human Services ("HHS") following the discovery of a breach of unsecured protected health information. HITECH also requires business associates of HIPAA-covered entities to notify the covered entity in the event of the breach. The Act required HHS to issue interim final regulations with respect to the new breach notification requirements. On August 24, 2009, the HHS interim final regulations were published in the Federal Register.