Posts tagged Privacy Policy

behavioral analytics, behavioral marketing, behavorial advertising, cookies, EU, European Union, Google, international, Privacy Policy

European Criticism for Google's New Privacy Policy

By W. Scott Blackmer on February 28, 2012

Google's new privacy policy (and its plans to create user profiles across multiple online services) has drawn fire from European data protection authorities. Online and mobile retailers and service providers should take account of a renewed emphasis on transparency and proportionality in collecting data about users.

Amazon, Apple, Apps, California, CalOPPA, Google, Harris, HP, Microsoft, Mobile, mobile privacy, privacy bill of rights, Privacy Policy, RIM, Shine the Light, White House

Privacy in Principle (As California Goes, So Goes the Nation? Part Four)

By InfoLawGroup LLP on February 27, 2012

What happened in the privacy world last week? On Thursday, just before the release of the White House Paper, California Attorney General Kamala Harris announced an agreement with the leading operators of mobile application platforms to privacy principles designed to bring the mobile app industry in line with a California law requiring mobile apps that collect personal information to have a privacy policy. It might be argued that the White House is now enunciating principles and best practices, and encouraging legislation of principles, that have long been embodied not only as best practice but as actual legislation under California law.

Buzz, consent, EPIC, FTC, FTC Act, Google, InfoLawGroup, information law group, privacy, privacy enforcement, Privacy Policy, Section 5, Segalis

EPIC Alleges Epic FTC Fail In Google Saga; We Review the Complaint

By InfoLawGroup LLP on February 13, 2012

On February 8, 2012, the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) asked the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia to compel the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to enforce the terms of the agency's Google Buzz privacy settlement with Google. EPIC seeks to compel the FTC to stop Google's planned consolidation of user data from across the company's services into a single profile for each user under a single privacy policy. EPIC has alleged that the proposed changes and the way Google seeks to implement the changes violate the Google Buzz consent order. The District Court will hear the case before March 1, 2012.In this post, we discuss the highlights of EPIC's complaint, Google's response and lessons learned.