Posts tagged security measures

Facebook, LinkedIn, privacy, Security, security breach, security measures, social media, social network, trade secrets, twitter

The Legal Implications of Social Networking Part Three: Data Security

By InfoLawGroup LLP on January 09, 2012

In 2011, InfoLawGroup began its "Legal Implications" series for social media by posting Part One (The Basics) and Part Two (Privacy). In this post (Part Three), we explore how security concerns and legal risk arise and interact in the social media environment.There are three main security-related issues that pose potential security-related legal risk. First, to the extent that employees are accessing and using social media sites from company computers (or increasingly from personal computers connected to company networks or storing sensitive company data), malware, phishing and social engineering attacks could result in security breaches and legal liability. Second, spoofing and impersonation attacks on social networks could pose legal risks. In this case, the risk includes fake fan pages or fraudulent social media personas that appear to be legitimately operated. Third, information leakage is a risk in the social media context that could result in an adverse business and legal impact when confidential information is compromised.

cloud computing, Guidelines, NIST, security measures

Third in our Cloud Computing Webinar Series

By InfoLawGroup LLP on May 20, 2011

In the next in our series of free webinars on cloud computing, Information Law Group Attorney Richard Santalesa examines implications arising from NIST's "Guidelines on Security and Privacy in Public Cloud Computing," with a focus on the legal considerations any team tasked with implementation of security best practices will need to grapple with.To register for this free one hour webinar on May 24 at 12pm ET, visit - http://bit.ly/kyRdku

accuracy, bill, consent, data, data accuracy, data integrity, data security, integrity, measures, notice, privacy, privacy notice, Regulations, Security, security measures

FAQ on the "BEST PRACTICES Act" - Part Two

By InfoLawGroup LLP on August 04, 2010

We recently published the first part of our FAQ series on Congressman Bobby Rush's new data privacy bill known as "Building Effective Strategies to Promote Responsibility Accountability Choice Transparency Innovation Consumer Expectations and Safeguards Act (a.k.a. "BEST PRACTICES Act" or "Act"). In Part One we looked at some of the key definitions and requirements concerning transparency, notice and individual choice, mandates around accuracy, access and dispute resolution, and finally data security and data minimization requirements under the Act. Part Two will focus on the "Safe Harbor" outlined in the Act, various exemptions for de-identified information and application and enforcement.

bill, consent, data accuracy, data integrity, data security, notice, privacy, privacy notice, Regulation, Security, security measures

FAQ on the "BEST PRACTICES Act" - Part One

By InfoLawGroup LLP on July 22, 2010

Congressman Bobby Rush has introduced a new data privacy bill to Congress known as the "Building Effective Strategies to Promote Responsibility Accountability Choice Transparency Innovation Consumer Expectations and Safeguards" Act (a.k.a. "BEST PRACTICES Act" or "Act").We have put together a summary of the Act in "FAQ" format. In Part One we look at some of the key definitions, requirements concerning transparency, notice and individual choice, mandates around accuracy, access and dispute resolution, and finally data security and data minimization requirements under the Act. Part Two will focus on the "Safe Harbor" outlined in the Act, various exemptions for deidentified information, and provisions concerning the application and enforcement of the Act.

appropriate, EU, EU Data Protection Directive, international, reasonable, security measures

Code or Clear? Encryption Requirements (Part 3)

By W. Scott Blackmer on October 01, 2009

In other posts, I addressed the trend in the United States to require encryption for certain categories of personal data that are sought by ID thieves and fraudsters - especially Social Security Numbers, driver's license numbers, and bank account or payment card details - as well as for medical information, which individuals tend to consider especially sensitive. These concerns are not, of course, limited to the United States. Comprehensive data protection laws in Europe, Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere include general obligations to maintain "reasonable" or "appropriate" or "proportional" security measures, usually without further elaboration. Some nations have gone further, however, to specify security measures.

appropriate, civil litigation, compliance, FTC, legal requirements, negligence, portable devices, public networks, reasonable, security measures, unfair practices, wireless

Code or Clear? Encryption Requirements under Information Privacy and Security Laws (Part 1)

By W. Scott Blackmer on October 01, 2009

"Exactly what data do we have to encrypt, and how?" That's a common question posed by IT and legal departments, HR and customer service managers, CIOs and information security professionals. In the past, they made their own choices about encryption, balancing the risks of compromised data against the costs of encryption. Those costs are measured not merely by expense but also by increased processing load, user-unfriendliness, and the remote but real possibility of lost or corrupted decryption keys resulting in inaccessible data. After weighing the costs and benefits, most enterprises decided against encryption for all but the most sensitive applications and data categories.