Posts in Workplace Privacy

Boris, data, enforcement, Facebook, InfoLawGroup, information law group, National Labor Relations Act, National Labor Relations Board, NLRA, NLRB, privacy, protection, Segalis, social media, workplace privacy

NLRB Holds "Facebook" Firing Justified on Alternative Grounds, but Finds Policy Unlawful

By InfoLawGroup LLP on November 03, 2011

As we have discussed on our blog, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has continued a campaign of enforcement actions against employers who, according to the NLRB, have unlawfully terminated employees for discussing working conditions on social media. As we reported, in the first of such "Facebook" enforcement actions to come before an NLRB administrative judge, the employer was ordered to reinstate five employees and to pay back their wages.On September 28, 2011, in the second "Facebook" case to reach an NLRB administrative judge, an employer was found to have been justified in terminating an employee car salesman for Facebook postings that mocked the employer and did not concern working conditions

Boris Segalis, Dan Or-Hof, email monitoring, employee privacy, ILITA, InfoLawGroup, information law group, Israel, privacy enforcement, privacy litigation, Privacy Protection Act, workplace privacy

Israel's National Labor Court Imposes Strict Limits on Employee Monitoring

By InfoLawGroup LLP on February 10, 2011

Dan Or-Hof, a privacy and technology partner at the Israeli law firm Pearl Cohen Zedek Latzer is reporting that a decision by Israel's National Labor Court imposes severe restrictions on the employers' ability to monitor employee emails. Organizations with employees in Israel must promptly take steps to verify that their employee monitoring policies and practices in the country are consistent with the ruling.

Boris Segalis, employee privacy, Facebook, InfoLawGroup, information law group, NLRB, privacy enforcement, social media, workplace privacy

Employer Settles Facebook Firing Suit with NLRB

By InfoLawGroup LLP on February 08, 2011

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has announced that settlement has been reached in the closely watched Facebook firing suit brought by the agency.We have previously reported on our blog that the NLRB filed an administrative complaint against a Connecticut ambulance company alleging that the company violated an employee's federal rights by firing her for criticizing a manager on Facebook. In the complaint, the NLRB took the position that union and non-union employees have a right to criticize their employers, management or working conditions, and cannot be punished for engaging in such protected activity. The NLRB also alleged that the company maintained overly-broad rules in its employee handbook regarding blogging, Internet posting, and communications between employees. The complaint asserted that an employee's right to criticize the employer and management is an extension of the federal right to discuss unionization and form unions.

Boris Segalis, EEOC, employee privacy, InfoLawGroup, NLRB, privacy enforcement, Quon, social media, Stengart, workplace privacy

Employee Privacy Gains in the United States

By InfoLawGroup LLP on January 13, 2011

2010 arguably was a breakout year for consumer privacy in the U.S., but the year also brought about significant changes to the legal landscape of employee privacy. Federal and state court decisions, state legislation and agency actions suggest that the U.S. may be moving towards a greater level of privacy protection for employees. Employers are well-advised to consider these developments in reviewing and revising policies that affect the privacy of their employees.

20/20, ABA, client confidentiality, COPRAC, encrypt, encryption, ethics, Formal Opinion Interim No- 08-0002, lawyers, New York State Bar Association, online storage, Opinion 842, professional responsibility, State Bar of California, technology, wifi

Legal Implications of Cloud Computing -- Part Five (Ethics or Why All Lawyers-Not Just Technogeek Lawyers Like Me-Should Care About Data Security)

By InfoLawGroup LLP on October 19, 2010

So, you thought our cloud series was over? Wishful thinking. It is time to talk about ethics. Yes, ethics. Historically, lawyers and technologists lived in different worlds. The lawyers were over here, and IT was over there. Here's the reality: Technology - whether we are talking cloud computing, ediscovery or data security generally - IS very much the business of lawyers. This post focuses on three recent documents, ranging from formal opinions to draft issue papers, issued by three very prominent Bar associations -- the American Bar Association (ABA), the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA), and the State Bar of California (CA Bar). These opinions and papers all drive home the following points: as succinctly stated by the ABA, "[l]awyers must take reasonable precautions to ensure that their clients' confidential information remains secure"; AND lawyers must keep themselves educated on changes in technology and in the law relating to technology. The question, as always, is what is "reasonable"? Also, what role should Bar associations play in providing guidelines/best practices and/or mandating compliance with particular data security rules? Technology, and lawyer use of technology, is evolving at a pace that no Bar association can hope to meet. At the end of the day, do the realities of the modern business world render moot any effort by the Bar(s) to provide guidance or impose restrictions? Read on and tell us - and the ABA - what you think.

Cloud, cloud computing, EU, EU Data Protection Directive, EU Directive, European Union, Germany, international data transfers, Safe Harbor, transborder data flows

European Reservations?

By W. Scott Blackmer on August 25, 2010

German state data protection authorities have recently criticized both cloud computing and the EU-US Safe Harbor Framework. From some of the reactions, you would think that both are in imminent danger of a European crackdown. That's not likely, but the comments reflect some concerns with recent trends in outsourcing and transborder data flows that multinationals would be well advised to address in their planning and operations.

acceptable use policy, California constitution privacy clause, communications, content review, employee, employer, Fourth Amenment, monitoring, Ninth Circuit, Quon, search, Stored Communications Act, Supreme Court

Quon: US Supreme Court Rules Against Privacy on Employer-Issued Devices

By W. Scott Blackmer on June 17, 2010

The United States Supreme Court issued its decision today in City of Ontario, California v. Quon, ruling that a public employer's examination of an employee's personal text messages on a government-issued pager did not violate the Fourth Amendment. Justice Kennedy's opinion for the Court remarked that a review of messages on an employer-provided device would similarly be regarded as "reasonable and normal in the private-employer context."

Binding Corporate Rules, clauses, cloud computing, consent, contract, controller, EU, EU Data Protection Directive, EU Directive, European Union, offshoring, outsourcing, processor, Safe Harbor, sstandard, standard contractual clauses

Do the New EU Processing Clauses Apply to You?

By W. Scott Blackmer on June 10, 2010

A new set of EU standard contract clauses ("SCCs" or "model contracts") for processing European personal data abroad came into effect on May 15, 2010. Taken together with a recent opinion by the official EU "Article 29" working group on the concepts of "controller" and "processor" under the EU Data Protection Directive, this development suggests that it is time to review arrangements for business process outsourcing, software as a service (SaaS), cloud computing, and even interaffiliate support services, when they involve storing or processing personal data from Europe in the United States, India, and other common outsourcing locations.

acceptable use policy, behavioral marketing, confidentiality, data protection, EU, European Union, Facebook, Federal Trade Commission, fraud, FTC, identity theft, privacy, social media, social networking

Social Networking: Setting Boundaries in a Borderless Brave New World

By W. Scott Blackmer on May 29, 2010

Social networking entails some risks and responsibilities. It may implicate privacy and labor law, confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements, advertising regulations, defamation, and other legal regimes, across borders in a global medium. Users, and their employers, need to be aware of these risks and responsibilities in deciding how to make best use of social media.

compliance, contract management, data protection, data security, information governance, information security, management, pia, privacy, privacy audit, privacy governance, privacy impact assessment, procurement, risk management, security governance, standards

Information Governance

By W. Scott Blackmer on May 06, 2010

Security governance is often well established in large organizations, but privacy governance typically lags. It is time for a broader approach to "information governance" that focusses on the kinds of sensitive data handled by the enterprise and establishes policies to assure compliance and effective risk management, as well as better customer, employee, government, and business relations.

IAPP, International Association of Privacy Professionals

My Notes from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit 2010

By InfoLawGroup LLP on April 21, 2010

As some of you know, I tweeted my notes from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit 2010 yesterday and today (@Forsheit for those of you on Twitter). Since many of our readers are not on Twitter, I thought I would provide you with those notes here (minus the usual Twitter hashtags and abbreviations). Please note that there were multiple sessions, and this reflects only those I was able to attend, and only the information I could quickly record, putting virtual pen to paper. These are not direct quotes, unless specifically designated as such. Overall, I think it was a great conference, a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with other lawyers and privacy professionals, and to meet students, lawyers, and others looking to learn more about this constantly evolving legal and compliance space. For me, the conference highlight was Viktor Mayer-Schonberger's keynote this morning on The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age. Without further ado, here are my notes. Would love to hear your thoughts/reactions.

IAPP, International Association of Privacy Professionals, Red Flags Rule

Live from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC, It's Monday Afternoon

By InfoLawGroup LLP on April 19, 2010

This week, I will be providing short updates from the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC. The conference will be in full swing tomorrow, and I will report on various panels and topics of interest. In the meantime, as I prepare to see old and new friends at the Welcome Reception this evening, a few thoughts on what I expect to see and hear a lot over the next few days.

LovingCare, reasonable expectation of privacy, Stengart

Privacy, Privilege, and the Cloud, Oh My: Taking LovingCare to Heart

By InfoLawGroup LLP on April 03, 2010

What does workplace privacy have to do with the cloud? Everything. On Tuesday, the New Jersey Supreme Court issued its opinion in Stengart v. LovingCare Agency, Inc., --- A.2d ----, 2010 WL 1189458 (N.J. March 30, 2010), and came out on the side of protecting employee privacy and the attorney-client privilege in personal Yahoo! webmail (a cloud service) even though the employee used a company computer. While everyone has been busy writing about the implications of LovingCare for company policies governing employee expectations of privacy (and for good reason), few have stopped to note that LovingCare is a cloud case. LovingCare is one of only a few published opinions addressing the difficult issues surrounding employee use of webmail and other cloud services on company computers where the attorney-client privilege is at stake, and the impact of the LovingCare decision will undoubtedly be felt for years to come by nearly every employer across the country, both in crafting policies for employee use of company computer systems and in conducting discovery in nearly every employment-related litigation. The machine may be the employer's, but, in the post-LovingCare world, the data may be the employee's - at least where the cloud and the attorney-client privilege are involved. You can read my detailed case analysis in this post.